Friday, 17 January 2014

A mistress

A mistress is a permanent feminine lover and escort who is not wedded to her partner; the term is employed particularly when her partner is married. The association generally is steady and at least partially-lasting; however, the couple does not live jointly publicly. Also the relation is generally, but not always, covert. There is a conclusion that a mistress may be “kept”— i.e., that the lover is financing some of the woman's living expenditures.

The word mistress was initially employed as a impartial counterpart to mister or master.

Wednesday, 6 March 2013

Mistress

A is a long-term female lover and companion who are not married to her partner; the term is used especially when her partner is married. The relationship generally is stable and at least semi-permanent; however, the couple does not live together openly. Also the relationship is usually, but not always, secret. There is an implication that a mistress may be "kept" i.e., that the lover is paying for some of the woman's living expenses. The word mistress was originally used as a neutral counterpart to mister or master.

Friday, 11 May 2012

Ochnaceae

The family Ochnaceae, or wild plane family, comprises mainly trees or shrubs, and more rarely herbaceous plants. Species of the Ochnaceae are found from subtropical to tropical regions. They are best represented in South America. The family has about 53 genera and 600 species.

Members of the Ochnaceae all have evergreen petiolate leaves, which are sometimes leathery (found at the genus Ochna). The leaves are most often simple and alternate, but can be racemose, paniculate or more rarely pinnate. Pinnate leaves are typical of Godoya.
These species are hermaphroditic.

Wednesday, 21 September 2011

Robert Llewellyn

Llewellyn's first foray into the world of show business started out as a hobby, organising a few amateur cabaret evenings in a riverside warehouse overlooking Tower Bridge in London. The shows were a great success and he eventually helped form an alternative comedy theatre group called The Joeys. Within six months he had stopped working as a shoemaker and started performing professionally with the group alongside Bernie Evans, Nigel Ordish and Graham Allum. The group toured the UK and Europe in the early 1980s with an initial idea of exploring sexual politics between men . Llewellyn wrote much of the material, and also began writing novels. The group split in 1985, having toured for years and done thousands of shows.